Breakout Descriptions

Fall Conference 2016

Breakout Session Descriptions

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Day 1 Session I

A. The Software Over Production Problem

Overproduction is rampant in IT Product Development. You don't believe me? According to the Standish group CHAOS report, 64 percent of the features in systems are rarely—or never—used and that translates to a lot of wasted time and money. Join Brandon as he introduces some of the reasons for this overproduction and how you can reduce waste using data-driven techniques you can employ on your projects right away. Find out how to instrument existing applications and develop new requirements based on operational profiles of the current system. Learn to use A/B testing—a technique for trying out and analyzing alternative implementations—on your current system to determine which new features will deliver the most business value. With these tools and others that will be discussed at hand, your organization can turn data into learning in order to significantly reduce overproduction on your software projects.

Learning Objectives

  • Attendees will be able to identify sources of overproduction in software
  • Attendees will learn 7 techniques for attacking the problem and how each has been applied in a real world situation

Presenter: Brandon Carlson

A self-proclaimed nerd, Brandon Carlson works for Lean TECHniques, Inc., an IT consultancy that helps teams deliver high-value, high-quality products to market. Since starting his career in 1995, Brandon has held positions from development and architecture to management—and he’s still learning. Passionate about elevating the performance of IT as a whole, he has helped numerous organizations from startups to Fortune 100 companies improve their product development and delivery systems.


B. Developing a Problem Solving Culture

Using MDI boards and problem solving to change organizational culture

In this breakout session you will learn about Henderson's initial development and implementation and MDI boards. You will hear about their journey as they implemented a problem-solving training to cultivate an organization of proactive problem solvers. They will also discuss the development of "PSU School" (Problem Solving University), and the training and implementation of MDI and GEMBA within the organization. You will hear about the initial road blocks, setbacks, and the early successes of the programs.

Attendees of this breakout will:

  • Be able to identify potential road blocks to look for when implementing MDI, GEMBA
  • Learn organizational must have’s for successful Problem solving programs Identifying and cultivating problem solvers

Presenter: Christopher Reese

Christopher has his BA in Public Administration and MA in Business Administration. He has been at Henderson Products for17 years and serves as their DDMS Leader.


C. Lean in the Office: It’s about developing people (repeats on Day 2)

Learn more about how lean and its focus on customer value, continuous improvement, and respect for people applies to knowledge and service work.

Using examples and stories from our public sector clients, the presenters will share how lean principles can be adopted in government agencies—with lessons that apply to any sort of knowledge or service work.

A key tool in our approach is getting people at all levels of an organization to get comfortable with problem solving—the presenters will show you how they do that, and what you’ll need to get started (hint: it’s not much!).

When people aren’t in agreement about who their customers are, feel they don’t have “capacity” for improvement, or rush to find someone to “hold accountable” for problems, things can get messy. They will leave you with some key points about how to avoid common entanglements that come up when applying lean thinking to service work.

Presenters: Alicia Huguelet and Brian Kerr

Alicia Huguelet has over 10 years of experience in the health and human services sector working to advance the health and well-being of individuals and families. Prior to joining Koné Consulting she worked at the Illinois Department of Human Services where she supervised teams charged with implementing business process changes, developing program and policy improvements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, and child care subsidies, and creating new data tools to better manage these work support programs. Alicia has also worked with various nonprofits in the health and human services arena where she focused on issues surrounding access to health care and food and nutrition issues. Her areas of expertise include business process improvement, policy analysis, advocacy, community organizing, and communications.

Brian Kerr’s consulting work is focused on helping organizations increase the customer value they create. Brian facilitates, trains, and does whatever else he can to make space for staff-directed, management-supported continuous improvement. He has over 10 years of experience designing, building, and supporting web applications, including experience supporting teams in the practice of software development. His expertise includes user experience, interaction design, and software accessibility.


D. Deconstructing Lean Thinking

Lean thinking, the possession and practical exercise of a lean mentality by members of an organization, is generally acknowledged as a necessary pre-condition for its successful transformation. The frequency of discussions suggests that it is a popular, but also a profoundly vexing topic. There are so many things we do not yet understand.

Is lean thinking an individual characteristic or trait, a distinctive mode of cognition; if so, does it complement or displace conventional modes of organizational thinking; does it require a group of people, or even an organization or extended supply and distribution network, to manifest and sustain itself; does it exist at the conceptual (semantic), configurational (syntactic) or activity (pragmatic) level; how are common sense and shared reality created, through communication, behaviors or artifacts; what is its manner of propagation through organizations, changing them; how we can assess the maturity of this process? And what is the effect of the many different industries, production and service processes, organizational scales, national and organizational cultures, forms of ownership and labor relations, or operative business models?

This presentation takes a journey of discovery through this evolving landscape. While pointing out some of its less explored features, it also aims to set out a practical framework for lean thinking by exploring several of its important antecedents. We shall see how curiosity can be structured in a disciplined way, how different modalities of inquiry arising out of curiosity then inform reasoning, and how reasoning is translated into action. Whereas much of the existing literature focuses on what lean thinking is about, the perspective taken here is on how it occurs. This allows insights not only into the nature of lean thinking but also highlights some of the ways in which it adjusts to different environments and contexts, as listed above.

Attendees will learn about the challenges of understanding lean thinking in its various manifestations, organizational contexts and environments and how a systematic learning process can be constructed to support the individual and organizational capacity for its development.

Presenter: Dr. Joachim Knuf

Dr. Knuf was one of the original architects of the model lean systems research and education program created at the invitation, and with financial and mentoring support, of Toyota Motor Manufacturing between 1994 and 2006 at the University of Kentucky Center for Manufacturing. He has served in leadership positions in education, healthcare and manufacturing, currently as Senior Advanced Lean Practitioner at Crown, with special responsibilities for non-manufacturing workflow and training systems support. Dr. Knuf has consulted, coached, trained, educated and published on lean thinking and organizational transformation for over 20 years.


DAY 1 Session II

E. Mind Maps - Bringing Order to Chaos

A mind map is very helpful in capturing and organizing ideas and turning them into an action plan. Mind maps help you gain structure and focus. The benefits of mind maps and how to create them will be taught. The attendees will do an exercise where they create a mind map. Attendees will be able to create and use mind maps on their own after the session. During the exercise, attendees can create their mind map either on paper (which will be provided) or in softcopy. If softcopy is preferred, the attendee should bring their laptop with them to the session; and prior to the session the attendee should have downloaded FreeMind to their laptop and become familiar with basic text entry and node creation.

Attendees will learn:

  • How to bring order to chaos by capturing and organizing ideas and turning them into an action plan.
  • How to use mind maps to facilitate brainstorming with a team.
  • The do's and don'ts for creating mind maps.

Presenter: Pat O’Connor

Pat is a certified Lean Six Sigma Black Belt, has practiced LSS for the last 10 years, and is currently the Team Lead of Alliant Energy's LSS department. Pat has completed over 100 LSS projects, more than 80 as the lead belt, and has used mind maps on the majority of his projects. Project types include 2P, RI, VSM, 5S, Work Balance, DMAIC, and use of tools and techniques to solve business problems that don't fit traditional project types. Pat has a BS in electrical engineering and 32 years of experience across careers at IBM, MCI/WorldCom, and Alliant.


F. Building a Constructive, Continuous Improvement Culture - Are you Attracting, Engaging & Retaining Your Talent? (repeats on Day 2)

Come discuss and learn the real importance of your culture to your organizations' future. Research shows that a Constructive culture will improve outcomes including employee engagement, safety and reliability, successful merger integration, creativity, adaptability, and customer satisfaction. Come learn about Constructive vs. Destructive Culture styles and experience the Culture Roadmap tool. Your organization has a culture whether you're doing anything about it or not. If you'd like to understand how your culture and climate may be impacting work on your current top performance priorities – join us.

Attendees who attend this breakout will:

  • Understand the keys to Constructive culture development—facilitating behavioral change that leads to profitability and long-term effectiveness.
  • Learn the Seven Culture Fundamentals
  • Experience the Culture Roadmap tool for your organization - are you supporting your mission and maximizing your impact?
  • Learn the key aspects and differences between a constructive culture and a defensive culture (passive and/or aggressive) to engage your workforce at an individual, group/department and organizational level.

Presenter: Susan Clark

Susan Clark joined Iowa State University – CIRAS in 2011. She brings expertise in training, coaching and consulting with thousands of individuals and groups in various industries including manufacturing, private industry, academia, financial services, health care, non-profit, and government. She is a Global Change Circle Member started by Human Synergistics International – the world’s leading culture experts. She is involved with helping organizations identify their current and ideal cultures. Susan has also facilitated organizations and teams at all levels on continual improvement strategies and tools for over 11 years. While a Vice President of an international HR consulting firm she managed several career centers for Fortune 100 companies. As the former Manager of Training for Brown University she developed, implemented and presented training programs including communication, management and leadership development. Susan began her career as a Legislative Correspondent in the United States Senate.


G. The Value of Value Stream Mapping - An Essential Launchpad for Lean

Attendees will learn how to create value stream maps for a complex manufacturing environment. Engaging visuals will be used to help participants quickly understand the methodology. Presenters will share the Kaizen projects selected as a result of the maps. A panel will describe how they identified lean opportunities not previously considered.

Attendees from this session will:

  • Be able to describe the basic components and steps of value stream mapping.
  • Share the application of value stream maps to lean principles.
  • Experience lively question and answer dialogue between the experienced lean
  • manufacturing panel and the participants.

Presenter: Mike Shindelar, Jocelyn Wallace and Henderson Team Members

Mike joined Feed Energy in October 2010 as the company's process engineer and was named COO of Feed Energy in August 2014. Mike brings more than twenty years of management experience and a proven track record of helping companies implement LEAN and quality control fundamentals. He has worked in several industry sectors including defense, turkey production, electrical and metal equipment manufacturing, architectural millwork and mechanical contracting.

Jocelyn Wallace has been a Senior Business Advisor to Feed Energy Company for four years and owns Red Eleven, a consulting firm. Prior to Feed Energy she worked for Principal Financial Group in a process improvement role for their Print-to-Mail facility, implementing barcode technology to improve throughput. Jocelyn holds a Master’s Degree from Drake University and has completed several Project Management Institute (PMI) courses in business analytics and project management.

At Feed Energy, she collaborated with plant production team members to create a value stream map for their core manufacturing processes.

Manufacturing plant team members will be included after the presentation as part of a Q&A panel.


H. Integrating Technology into Your Lean Implementation

In this breakout case studies will be shared in which technology was used in different capacities to implement changes of varying degrees for lean in the office. From using different technology platforms to simply share information only for the duration of implementation, to making new technology an integral part of the lean changes so that a department could go paperless, participants in this workshop will learn about how lean teams can embrace technology to fit their needs. Participants will be able to share their successes and concerns as well, and share about different technological tools at our disposal.

Attendees of this breakout will learn

  • Successful use of technology (SharePoint, GoogleDrive) for Implementation use
  • Successful use of technology as a Lean goal (SharePoint to make a department paperless)
  • Challenges and drawbacks of using technology
  • Advantages and disadvantages of some tools

Presenter: Emily Betz

Emily is the Process Improvement & Technology Coordinator at DMACC in the Business Resources Department. She holds a B.A. from Central College and an M.A. from SUNY Stony Brook. Emily is a certified workplacelean® trainer, helping clients evaluate and improve work processes both across Iowa and nationally. She is also trained in Microsoft SharePoint®, providing training and consulting services to departments and businesses wanting to transition to an electronic document management system.


Day 2 Session III Breakout Sessions

I. Sustaining your lean transformation journey -An organizational engagement strategy

Mary Greeley Medical Center has been on a lean transformation journey since 2010. Through several cycles of learning we can share our success and our opportunities for improvement as we continue on this journey. We will share our approach for engaging leaders to support those closest to the work to design and re-design work processes that bring value to the customer.

Participants in this breakout will learn:

  • Engagement strategies for leadership buy-in
  • Engaging those closest to the work to implement small tests of change
  • Management of projects and documenting improvements

Presenter: Karen Kiel Rosser

Vice President & Quality Improvement Officer with oversight of quality & safety practices at MGMC including Baldrige framework and lean transformation. Karen was the 2015 recipient of the Iowa Lean Consortium’s Lean Campion award.


J. Implementing a Lean Management System - Taking your organization beyond tools and events

In this breakout will discuss the next phase of the Lean journey beyond learning to use basic Lean tools and conducting Kaizen events - implementing a Lean Management System. We will review the main components of a Lean Management System, and outline the benefits of implementing each using real-life examples from the Presenter and audience. The focus of this session will be on Leader Standard Work, Visual Controls, and Daily Accountability.

Participants in this breakout will

  • Be able to identify where their own organization is on its Lean journey.
  • Learn the main components of a Lean Management System (LMS).
  • Learn benefits of implementing an LMS, be able to advocate within their organization.
  • Obtain practical advice to take back to their work for implementation

Presenter: Randy Siever

Randy graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science and an MBA from the University of Kentucky. Following graduation, Randy joined LeanCor Supply Chain Group as a logistics engineer in 2007. As the company grew, Randy was promoted, eventually becoming the Director of Operations. During his time at LeanCor, Randy’s focus included hiring and team member development, overseeing the implementation of new logistics customers, and working with his team to develop a Lean culture within the office. In 2014, Randy left LeanCor to found NovIntu Software Solutions with his business partner, Colin Willis. The company helps individuals and organizations better see and perform their work by implementing custom software and visual management solutions, including their own product, The Lean Office. Randy lives in Lexington, Kentucky with his wife and two sons.


K. Lean in the Office: It’s about developing people

Learn more about how lean and its focus on customer value, continuous improvement, and respect for people applies to knowledge and service work. Using examples and stories from our public sector clients, we will share how lean principles can be adopted in government agencies—with lessons that apply to any sort of knowledge or service work. A key tool in our approach is getting people at all levels of an organization to get comfortable with problem solving—so we’ll show you how we do that, and what you’ll need to get started (hint: it’s not much!).

When people aren’t in agreement about who their customers are, feel they don’t have “capacity” for improvement, or rush to find someone to “hold accountable” for problems, things can get messy. We’ll leave you with some key points about how to avoid common entanglements that come up when applying lean thinking to service work.

Presenters: Alicia Huguelet and Brian Kerr

Alicia Huguelet has over 10 years of experience in the health and human services

sector working to advance the health and well-being of individuals and families. Prior to joining Koné Consulting she worked at the Illinois Department of Human Services where she supervised teams charged with implementing business process changes, developing program and policy improvements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Medicaid, and child care subsidies, and creating new data tools to better manage these work support programs. Alicia has also worked with various nonprofits in the health and human services arena where she focused on issues surrounding access to health care and food and nutrition issues. Her areas of expertise include business process improvement, policy analysis, advocacy, community organizing, and communications.

Brian Kerr’s consulting work is focused on helping organizations increase the customer value they create. Brian facilitates, trains, and does whatever else he can to make space for staff-directed, management-supported continuous improvement. He has over 10 years of experience designing, building, and supporting web applications, including experience supporting teams in the practice of software development. His expertise includes user experience, interaction design, and software accessibility.


L. Building a Constructive, Continuous Improvement Culture

Are you Attracting, Engaging & Retaining Your Talent?

Come discuss and learn the real importance of your culture to your organizations' future. Research shows that a Constructive culture will improve outcomes including employee engagement, safety and reliability, successful merger integration, creativity, adaptability, and customer satisfaction. Come learn about Constructive vs. Destructive Culture styles and experience the Culture Roadmap tool to Your organization has a culture whether you're doing anything about it our not. If you'd like to understand how your culture and climate may be impacting work on your current top performance priorities – join us.

Attendees who attend this breakout will:

  • Understand the keys to Constructive culture development—facilitating behavioral change that leads to profitability and long-term effectiveness.
  • Learn the Seven Culture Fundamentals
  • Experience the Culture Roadmap tool for your organization - are you supporting your mission and maximizing your impact?
  • Learn the key aspects and differences between a constructive culture and a defensive culture (passive and/or aggressive) to engage your workforce at an individual, group/department and organizational level.

Presenter: Susan Clark

Susan Clark joined Iowa State University – CIRAS in 2011. She brings expertise in training, coaching and consulting with thousands of individuals and groups in various industries including manufacturing, private industry, academia, financial services, health care, non-profit, and government. She is a Global Change Circle Member started by Human Synergistics International – the world’s leading culture experts. She is involved with helping organizations identify their current and ideal cultures. Susan has also facilitated organizations and teams at all levels on continual improvement strategies and tools for over 11 years. While a Vice President of an international HR consulting firm she managed several career centers for Fortune 100 companies. As the former Manager of Training for Brown University she developed, implemented and presented training programs including communication, management and leadership development. Susan began her career as a Legislative Correspondent in the United States Senate.

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